My Leadership Both In And Out Of School

Some psychologists believe that a person’s personality determines whether they have the natural born ability to be a leader. However, not all leaders are born- they are made. Even when you are not in a position of authority, you have the potential to lead by speaking up. There are some circumstances that require a leader to step up and when no one else is around, it is important that someone has the courage to fill the role. I have demonstrated my leadership ability in and out of school- here is an example of each.

One of the best examples of my leadership during my school career happened Freshman Year. In my third class of the day, English Comp, my teacher looked around at the room of students and decided that we looked unsure of each other. Her solution was to assign a group project with 3 key parts- a written paper on the topic, a slideshow presentation, and a speaking presentation for in front of the class with group members she chose. Minutes after we had started talking about the project, everyone started arguing over their ideas. I sat quietly. I realized that someone needed to step up and take charge in an authoritative way. I interrupted their arguing with a confident excuse me and then stated my idea. I thought that we should all contribute our ideas to a box so it was anonymous and then we would discuss each before voting to find the best. Then, I thought we should collaborate on the specifics of the assignment so our individual parts were related before breaking into groups of two. By speaking up and showing leadership, I prevented a tedious, unproductive half hour before class let out.

An example of my leadership skills outside of school was in times of tragedy. A woman had tried to cross a street and had been hit by a moving vehicle. While everyone at the nearby café I was working at rushed to ‘help’ her, I took down the license plate of the driver speeding away. Then, I grabbed the emergency medical kit from the kitchen before telling my manager I was going to help that woman if I could. When I arrived on scene, the woman was wide-eyed from the pain she was in but she was conscious. She was also hyperventilating, probably going into shock from the accident and what was going on around her. As those around us argued about what to do, I loudly told everyone to step back. Then, I sat on the ground next to the woman and talked to her, using a soothing voice to calm her. Her breathing rate slowed and she relaxed until the ambulance arrived a few minutes later.

The above examples demonstrate a clear potential for leadership. Even though I consider myself an introvert, I have seen opportunities for leadership and seized them. After all, being a leader is not about your personality. It is about knowing that your opinion matters and learning to voice it.

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